Persistent Homology Guided Force-Directed Graph Layouts

Graphs are commonly used to encode relationships among entities, yet their abstractness makes them difficult to analyze. Node-link diagrams are popular for drawing graphs, and force-directed layouts provide a flexible method for node arrangements that use local relationships in an attempt to reveal the global shape of the graph. However, clutter and overlap of unrelated structures can lead to confusing graph visualizations. This paper leverages the persistent homology features of an undirected graph as derived information for interactive manipulation of force-directed layouts. We first discuss how to efficiently extract 0-dimensional persistent homology features from both weighted and unweighted undirected graphs. We then introduce the interactive persistence barcode used to manipulate the force-directed graph layout. In particular, the user adds and removes contracting and repulsing forces generated by the persistent homology features, eventually selecting the set of persistent homology features that most improve the layout. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of our approach across a variety of synthetic and real datasets.

Persistent Homology Guided Force-Directed Graph Layouts
A. Suh, M Hajij, B. Wang, C. Scheidegger, P. Rosen
Transaction on Visualization and Computer Graphics (InfoVis)

You Can’t Publish Replication Studies (and How to Anyways)

Reproducibility has been increasingly encouraged by communities of science in order to validate experimental conclusions, and replication studies represent a significant opportunity to vision scientists wishing contribute new perceptual models, methods, or insights to the visualization community. Unfortunately, the notion of replication of previous studies does not lend itself to how we communicate research findings. Simple put, studies that re-conduct and confirm earlier results do not hold any novelty, a key element to the modern research publication system. Nevertheless, savvy researchers have discovered ways to produce replication studies by embedding them into other sufficiently novel studies. In this position paper, we define three methods–re-evaluation, expansion, and specialization–for embedding a replication study into a novel published work. Within this context, we provide a non-exhaustive case study on replications of Cleveland and McGill’s seminal work on graphical perception. As it turns out, numerous replication studies have been carried out based on that work, which have both confirmed prior findings and shined new light on our understanding of human perception. Finally, we discuss how publishing a true replication study should be avoided, while providing suggestions for how vision scientists and others can still use replication studies as a vehicle to producing visualization research publications.

You Can’t Publish Replication Studies (and How to Anyways)
G. Quadri, P. Rosen
VIS x Vision Workshop at IEEE VIS

Using Contour Trees in the Analysis and Visualization of Radio Astronomy Data Cubes

The current generation of radio and millimeter telescopes, particularly the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), offers enormous advances in observing capabilities. While these advances represent an unprecedented opportunity to facilitate scientific understanding, the increased complexity in the spatial and spectral structure of these ALMA data cubes lead to challenges in their interpretation. In this paper, we perform a feasibility study for applying topological data analysis and visualization techniques never before tested by the ALMA community. Through techniques based on contour trees, we seek to improve upon existing analysis and visualization workflows of ALMA data cubes, in terms of accuracy and speed in feature extraction. We review our application development process in building effective analysis and visualization capabilities for the astrophysicists. We also summarize effective design practices by identifying domain-specific needs of simplicity, integrability, and reproducibility, in order to best target and service the large astrophysics community.

Using Contour Trees in the Analysis and Visualization of Radio Astronomy Data Cubes
P Rosen, A Seth, B Mills, A Ginsburg, J Kamenetzky, J Kern, CR Johnson, B Wang
Topological Methods in Data Analysis and Visualization (TopoInVis)

Homology-Preserving Dimensionality Reduction via Manifold Landmarking and Tearing

Dimensionality reduction is an integral part of data visualization. It is a process that obtains a structure preserving low-dimensional representation of the high-dimensional data. Two common criteria can be used to achieve a dimensionality reduction: distance preservation and topology preservation. Inspired by recent work in topological data analysis, we are on the quest for a dimensionality reduction technique that achieves the criterion of homology preservation, a specific version of topology preservation. Specifically, we are interested in using topology-inspired manifold landmarking and manifold tearing to aid such a process and evaluate their effectiveness.

Homology-Preserving Dimensionality Reduction via Manifold Landmarking and Tearing
L Yan, Y Zhao, P Rosen, C Scheidegger, B Wang
Visualization in Data Science (VDS at IEEE VIS 2018)

Visual detection of structural changes in time-varying graphs using persistent homology

Topological data analysis is an emerging area in exploratory data analysis and data mining. Its main tool, persistent homology, has become a popular technique to study the structure of complex, high-dimensional data. In this paper, we propose a novel method using persistent homology to quantify structural changes in time-varying graphs. Specifically, we transform each instance of the time-varying graph into metric spaces, extract topological features using persistent homology, and compare those features over time. We provide a visualization that assists in time-varying graph exploration and helps to identify patterns of behavior within the data. To validate our approach, we conduct several case studies on real world data sets and show how our method can find cyclic patterns, deviations from those patterns, and one-time events in time-varying graphs. We also examine whether persistence-based similarity measure as a graph metric satisfies a set of well-established, desirable properties for graph metrics.

Visual detection of structural changes in time-varying graphs using persistent homology
Mustafa Hajij, Bei Wang, Carlos Scheidegger, Paul Rosen
IEEE Pacific Visualization Symposium (PacificVis) 2018

DSPCP: A data scalable approach for identifying relationships in parallel coordinates

Parallel coordinates plots (PCPs) are a well-studied technique for exploring multi-attribute datasets. In many situations, users find them a flexible method to analyze and interact with data. Unfortunately, using PCPs becomes challenging as the number of data items grows large or multiple trends within the data mix in the visualization. The resulting overdraw can obscure important features. A number of modifications to PCPs have been proposed, including using color, opacity, smooth curves, frequency, density, and animation to mitigate this problem. However, these modified PCPs tend to have their own limitations in the kinds of relationships they emphasize. We propose a new data scalable design for representing and exploring data relationships in PCPs. The approach exploits the point/line duality property of PCPs and a local linear assumption of data to extract and represent relationship summarizations. This approach simultaneously shows relationships in the data and the consistency of those relationships. Our approach supports various visualization tasks, including mixed linear and nonlinear pattern identification, noise detection, and outlier detection, all in large data. We demonstrate these tasks on multiple synthetic and real-world datasets.

DSPCP: A data scalable approach for identifying relationships in parallel coordinates
H Nguyen, P Rosen
IEEE transactions on visualization and computer graphics 24 (3), 1301-1315

Leveraging Peer Review in Visualization Education: A Proposal for a New Model

In visualization education, both science and humanities , the literature is often divided into two parts: the design aspect and the analysis of the visualization. However, we find limited discussion on how to motivate and engage visualization students in the classroom. In the field of Writing Studies, researchers develop tools and frameworks for student peer review of writing. Based on the literature review from the field of Writing Studies, this paper proposes a new framework to implement visualization peer review in the classroom to engage today’s students. This framework can be customized for incremental and double-blind review to inspire students and reinforce critical thinking about visualization.

Leveraging Peer Review in Visualization Education: A Proposal for a New Model
A. Friedman, P. Rosen
IEEE 2017 Pedagogy of Data Visualization Workshop

 

Correlation Coordinate Plots: Efficient Layouts for Correlation Tasks

Correlation is a powerful measure of relationships assisting in estimating trends and making forecasts. Its use is widespread, being a critical data analysis component of fields including science, engineering, and business. Unfortunately, visualization methods used to identify and estimate correlation are designed to be general, supporting many visualization tasks. Due in large part to their generality, they do not provide the most efficient interface, in terms of speed and accuracy for correlation identifying. To address this shortcoming, we first propose a new correlation task-specific visual design called Correlation Coordinate Plots (CCPs). CCPs transform data into a powerful coordinate system for estimating the direction and strength of correlation. To extend the functionality of this approach to multiple attribute datasets, we propose two approaches. The first design is the Snowflake Visualization, a focus+context layout for exploring all pairwise correlations. The second design enhances the CCP by using principal component analysis to project multiple attributes. We validate CCP by applying it to real-world data sets and test its performance in correlation-specific tasks through an extensive user study that showed improvement in both accuracy and speed of correlation identification.

Correlation Coordinate Plots: Efficient Layouts for Correlation Tasks
H Nguyen, P Rosen
International Joint Conference on Computer Vision, Imaging and Computer Graphics

Interpreting Galilean Invariant Vector Field Analysis via Extended Robustness

The topological notion of robustness introduces mathematically rigorous approaches to interpret vector field data. Robustness quantifies the structural stability of critical points with respect to perturbations and has been shown to be useful for increasing the visual interpretability of vector fields. However, critical points, which are essential components of vector field topology, are defined with respect to a chosen frame of reference. The classical definition of robustness, therefore, depends also on the chosen frame of reference. We define a new Galilean invariant robustness framework that enables the simultaneous visualization of robust critical points across the dominating reference frames in different regions of the data. We also demonstrate a strong connection between such a robustness-based framework with the one recently proposed by Bujack et al., which is based on the determinant of the Jacobian. Our results include notable observations regarding the definition of stable features within the vector field data.

Interpreting Galilean Invariant Vector Field Analysis via Extended Robustness
B Wang, R Bujack, P Rosen, P Skraba, H Bhatia, H Hagen
Topology-based Methods in Visualization (TopoInVis)

Using data indexing for remote visualization of point cloud data

We present a new approach for accessing and visualizing point-based data in CAD applications. Instead of developing a traditional database around spatial data structures, our approach augments a data indexing engine to enable quick access to data. The primary advantage of an indexing engine is flexibility. The approach enables both range queries for accessing data spatially and resolution queries to access data at appropriate spatial resolutions. Our approach is robust to very large datasets, naturally supporting remote visualization and near-real-time input data streams. We demonstrate our approach on 2 large datasets, one 45M points, the other 53M points.

Using data indexing for remote visualization of point cloud data
P Rosen, LA Piegl
Computer-Aided Design and Applications 14 (6), 789-795